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A Packet of Health

Por Andrea Bianchi, Nutrition Counselor, MyDiet™ Team -
A Packet of Health

You've probably heard someone say: “take a cup of tea and you’ll feel better.” Well, this assertion is not far from the truth. Centuries ago, the Chinese discovered the great benefits of tea, and that’s how it became popular until it reached the rest of the countries. 

Nowadays, science has shown many other benefits of regular consumption of hot tea in different aspects of health. Most studies have examined green tea. However, further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Heart disease:  Several studies have shown that consumption of hot tea on a regular basis can prevent heart attack, which is caused by atherosclerosis, as well as other types of  heart disease.  More studies are still needed to verify these findings.

Constipation:   Constipation is a disorder due to an inefficient motility of the large intestine. Among the main causes is a low consumption of fluids. Hot tea can help regulate your intestinal transit and improve the uncomfortable symptoms of constipation.

Cancer.   Cancer is often caused by free radicals (reactive substances that damage body tissues). Smoking, getting frequent exposure to UV radiation, and drinking coffee or alcohol on a regular basis are important risk factors accelerating cell oxidation. Hot tea provides many antioxidants that protect cells from free radicals, and this is important for decreasing the risk of many types of cancer, such as prostate, skin, and stomach.

Symptoms of menopause:  In healthy, post-menopausal women, consumption of hot tea may reduce symptoms of menopause, like hot flashes and insomnia.

Arthritis:  Some ingredients of tea, especially green tea, have anti-inflammatory effects. They also help reduce inflammation of the joints, and improve  arthritis pain.

Stuffy nose: When you catch a cold or flu, your nose becomes stuffy and uncomfortable. Drinking hot tea is an excellent way of staying hydrated and improving your breathing.


  1. Middleman, M. (2005) Tea’s Effect on Atherosclerosis Pilot Study. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved on December, 2008 from:
  2. U.S. National Library of Medicine and The National Institutes of Health. (2008) Green Tea. Retrieved on December, 2008 from:
  3. Clinical Center of The National Institutes of Health (2007) Patient Education: Managing Bowel Disfunction.Retrieved on December, 2008 from:


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